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"Shoes”
by
Alison Parham

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Robin Lysne

Appointment with Wild

Drawn to the beach
as if by appointment
scanning the waves
just beyond the breakers

Something huge is out there
dolphins or whales or sharks
stirring up water
rolling over
first a fin then a tail
ribbony back diving.

Its too close to shore
yet too far away to see well
at least three spouts every
minute or two
clearly whales

The wild is so close
such a rubbery ballet
flukes and fins and a
nose out of the water
blow and twirl then dive.
Is this play full tilt or a shark attach?
Another fluke now a long back
with a ridge line spine diving

dozens of people stop and watch
one woman, shouts, 
They’re just too close!
and as if she commands it
one pod joins another
then suddenly
all of them turn out to sea.

A fin, a splash
a swirl, fading
I never tire of this
wild sea explosion.

 

A Range of Ranges

As Spring abates
the wild Yuba River gushes
so fast you might be swept away
if you get too close.

Hills shimmer green and lush
with wildflowers fed from
lakes and icepack rush.

On my way to the coast
the Central Valley has already
gone golden in mid-May.
Dry summer heat has taken hold.

Further on, along the coast range
gullies are green
where runoff has kept them in
their winter favor as
sunward sides turn tawny.

Back to the Santa Cruz Mountains
fog keeps redwoods and oaks
forever green and thick
on steep terrain.

Cool ocean air gusts
over Hwy. 17 as our summer pattern
begins to breathe mist
over everything.


Awe on East Cliff

Full sheen of moon
a silver bowl on
glittering wedge spilling out over
the Monterey Bay.
We walk for the exercise but are
stopped in our quick pace
to marvel at this light.
We lean on the rail off East Cliff Drive.
Waves roll and sparkle then become
a black curl to white foam lines
then dissolve
as our conversation
into sand.


Well Within

                  Santa Cruz, CA

Outside the spa         double Datura spiral open
their claw-like petals turn up slightly.

As buds lengthen gradations appear from white to coral,
and blossoms rotate as a new-born star.

Inside I am led to my room where tea and two cups,
a towel, and a spa, with a gentle bubbling surface, invites.

Flute music sets the tone as I ease into the hot tub,
I soak for a while, then

with my arms over the transom of wood and paper screens
I delight in a Japanese garden outside.

A stand of black bamboo clacks in the breeze
The fish swim in a pond below

I watch their movements
relax my body

A white coy swims under red maple leaves
and around a stand of grasses.

It noses the surface for food, its maw opening and closing
then swims around a golden one, a spotted one, a brown one.

I could watch them for hours as I move my legs
the same way as their fins then slide back into the spa to float.

My hour is up. I shower and dress again. Feeling reborn
I slowly float out under the perfumed canopy of Datura

out the bamboo gate
stars glittering all the way through.


Winter Night Walk

Winter waves rise
from a steel plate surface
a dragon back uncurling
deep look into nothing

then it becomes too lazy
to fully rise up
utters collapse
into sheen
recedes and grows
again into another
attempt to rise

the dragon dies
Consumes my grief
itself and the
wicked way it rises 
without warning.


What the Sea Does for Us

On the Monterey Bay
this long curve of
white sand and rolls
of kelp lie
like sleeping mermaids,
head and one shoulder
a hip, a long fin
buried in sand.
Every part of it
could wash away
into the surf again.

Her exposed fin
grows another mermaid
who dives back into waves
through the briny sea
to rejoin her kind
through kelp forests
where seals and sea otters
swim and dive

I roll to my side,
stretch hair up, mimic
her shape, long legs
out to touch the surf
they become fins,
as the stress from the week
washes away.
I let the sea
take it all,
how something in me
follows her
into emerald caverns

Standing up to feel the powder sand
between bare toes,
all that was heavy is gone now
all that was
has washed away.

 

Robin White Turtle Lysne, M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. is an author of 5 books, artist and energy healer. Recent books are Handbook to Heart Path, An Energy Medicine Guide, and Poems for the Lost Deer, (BlueBoneBooks, Santa Cruz,CA, 2014).  Publications: Rattle, Phren-z online Magazine, Porter Gulch Review, Samizdat, Awkening Consciouesness Magazine, The Weekely Avocet, North American Review, Porcupine Literary Arts Magazine, etc. Member: Poetry San Jose, Poetry Santa Cruz, Emerald Street Poets in Santa Cruz.
She has two other books, her first novel and a memoir, ready to launch. She is a psychic/medium and energy healer with 25 years experience around the Bay Area and across the country by phone.

Emerald Street Poets
Marcia Adams
Len Anderson
Dane Cervine
Robin Lysne
Joanna Martin
Tom McKoy
Adela Najarro
Maggie Paul
Stuart Presley
Lisa Simon
Phillip Wagner

Featured Artist
Alison Parham

 

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